Archive for the ‘W4CY Radio Personalities’ Category

What Is Ghostwriting and How Much Does It Cost?

As a seasoned ghostwriter of over 10 books and countless eBooks, blog posts, and website content, I answer this question regularly. Individuals and companies hire ghostwriters for a wide range of projects, but for our purposes here, I’ll focus on full-length books of up to 250 pages.

In a 2012 article entitled Why Writing a Book Is Good Business, Forbes writer Erika Anderson says publishing a book enhances your personal and business credibility and your brand clarity. She also highlights a 2006 study of business book authors, which found that 96 percent reported a “positive, significant impact on their business from writing a book and would recommend the practice.”

I speak from my own experience. After publishing my loosely autobiographical, fictional novel Water Signs in 2008 my business expanded to include ghostwriting, when someone who bought my book at an event called me a few months later about writing his groundbreaking spiritual/political thriller Steps To Salvation. Until then, I’d never considered ghostwriting a full-length book for anyone, but now it’s one of my most popular services.

One of my favorite projects.

So, what is ghostwriting exactly?

It is a service where you entrust your concept for a fictional story, or the facts of your own life and experiences, e.g. a leadership/business book, self-help book, or memoir, to a professional writer who gathers relevant information from you, outlines your book, and writes it in your voice. That’s a basic starting point. Depending on the scope of the project, it can take anywhere from a few months months to several years to produce a high quality product. At this juncture in my career, I focus exclusively on nonfiction for entrepreneurs who understand that a book is an effective way to expand their influence, enhance their credibility, and launch new product lines and services.

While I can’t speak for every ghostwriter, I’ve developed my own process after years of experience, which I’ve distilled into seven steps:

  1. Investigation – I conduct a weekly recorded call with my client where I act as an investigative reporter and ask questions. Why recorded? To make it easier to capture information I’ll need later on as well as the client’s manner of speaking; in essence, their voice. This ensures that when I sit down to write, I’ll be writing as the client — not as me. Depending upon the scope and purpose of the story, the investigative part of the process can take anywhere from a few weeks to several months. I transcribe each call into a working Word doc and send my client updates each week.
  2. Collaboration – from there, I collaborate with the client to offer suggestions in terms of content and ensure they’re comfortable including certain things. For example, a woman I once worked with experienced a rape by a family member as a teenager. In the beginning, she was adamant about not identifying him, which I honored and understood. But as the process moved along, she decided to call him out. Either way, including the rape as a turning point in her life was necessary. Particularly when dealing with sensitive topics, the client is in control. My job as the ghostwriter (and editor) is to make professional suggestions based on knowledge and experience.
  3. Organization – once I have all the information, I listen to playback of all recordings and read the transcriptions to determine a logical sequence. Flow and pacing are just as important as content. Even if you have an incredible story to share, if not well organized, you’ll quickly lose your readers. In the case of fiction, once I have the real-life events, I then figure out characters, plot, and sequencing. Fiction demands a different kind of creativity. Once I know the actual story, I then spend time creating characters and mapping out a plot. I explain to my clients that the fictional version of their story will not mirror real life because it’s not a memoir. Aside from changing locations (dictated by the client), creative license may involve consolidating multiple real-life people into one character, amending the timeline of events for pacing purposes, and creating purely fictional situations to enhance the intrigue.
  4. Writing – as I said, ghostwriting demands the ability to write in someone else’s voice, which means getting into someone else’s head. The only way to accomplish this feat is by conducting the regular recorded interviews I described in the first bullet. Most importantly though, a ghostwriter must have a genuine interest in other people. Without it, it’s impossible to do the job well. Paradoxically, good writing is a product of pouring your heart and soul into your creation, yet in the case of a ghostwriter, it’s not really your work, so you must maintain a certain detachment while you treat the process as if the end result is your accomplishment. This is especially true if your name will not appear anywhere on the cover.
  5. Editing – after I’ve completed the manuscript, I review it with my client for content before I send it to a professional editor (I work with several talented people). As with the writing portion of the project, my client has the right to accept or decline any changes for as long as the book is in the editing phase. However, once my client approves the edits and their manuscript moves into the formatting phase, there are no further editorial changes.
  6. Formatting – since my ghostwriting packages are all-inclusive, once editing is completed, I send the approved manuscript to a professional formatter to design a customized interior. Elements of formatting include fonts, justification, interior photo layout (if photos are included), and table of contents alignment. Formatting for paperback and formatting for eBook involve unique characteristics, e.g. an eBook must be “clickable” to allow the reader to jump to different portions of the book, so both are included in the publishing package.
  7. Customized Cover Design – yes, readers do judge books by their covers, which is why customized cover design and consultation with a professional is included. If you have a concept in mind, my designer will bring it to life; if you don’t, he or she will happily create a compelling design concept based on the content of the book. I cannot stress the importance of cover design enough. It spells the difference between a reader clicking on your title to learn more and possibly purchase, or passing it by altogether. Come to think of it, the expression of not judging a book by its cover ironically applies to everything except books.

Now that you know how ghostwriting works, hopefully you have a better understanding of its value. Whether it’s me or someone else, your ghostwriter will spend countless hours fulfilling your dream of becoming a published author — or of adding more published books to your list of accomplishments. It demands time, talent, skill, discernment…and even a bit of amateur psychology for a good ghostwriter to produce a product their client can be proud of.

For a full listing of all services included in my ghostwriting packages, click here. Tune in to Your Book Your Brand Your Business Mondays at 5 PM Eastern.

How to Write a Quality Book Review

Since authors spend a great deal of time and effort — along with money — to write and publish their books, learning how to write a quality book review is one of the best ways for readers to express their appreciation and offer constructive feedback. Please note, I called it constructive feedback — not criticism for criticism’s sake. For potential new readers, a thoughtful review can make the difference between buying a book or clicking on the next title in their search for reading material worthy of an hour or more of their time.

What elements comprise a quality book review?

First, let’s define a bad book review. No, I’m not referring to legitimate criticism of characters, plot, pacing, writing, or any other vital aspect of a compelling story. I’m talking about generic reviews like, “I loved the book!” or “Wow, this is excellent!” or “This book is a must-read!” that omit any substantive descriptions as to why the reviewer feels that way. Conversely, the same principle applies to pithy one-or-two sentence reviews like, “Awful book!” “I can’t believe anyone would write this drivel!” or “Don’t waste your time reading.” Well, give a specific reason (or two, or three) as to why no one should bother with that particular book or you run the risk of looking like a troll who’s just shooting someone down for fun.

It doesn’t matter if it’s high praise or caustic criticism, the reviewer does the author (and his or her potential readers) a disservice by omitting specifics. Whether you love or hate a book (or fall somewhere in-between), here are some guidelines on how to write an effective, useful review for both authors and readers.

  1. Demonstrate You Have Actually Read the Book– sounds counter-intuitive, but I’m not advocating that reviewers should give away spoilers. However, it is possible to mention a few specifics about what you liked about the main character, themes, narration, dialogue, etc. What did you like or dislike about the protagonist or supporting characters? Why did the plot draw you in? Was the book thought-provoking? Edgy? Enlightening? Why?  Even if you select just one aspect and explain why it had an impact on you, for better or for worse, it will demonstrate your knowledge of the book.
  2. Offer a Balanced Perspective– as I mentioned, a great deal of time and energy goes into the production of a book. Whether you rate it 5-stars or 3-stars (more on that in point #4), identify what the author does well and the areas in which he or she could improve. Is the dialogue stilted but the prose captivating? Say so. Is the pacing too slow? Too fast? Explain why and give an example. Is a character well defined or one-dimensional? Offer a specific example that supports your opinion.
  3. Limit Your Review to One-to-Three Paragraphs– for maximum impact, keep it pithy. Select a few qualities about the book that stood out to you, whether it involves a secondary character, a particular scene, or the overarching themes. Again, you don’t want to give away spoilers; you want to focus on your most indelible impressions of the book. No one wants to read a lengthy, rambling review, and from a copywriting/marketing perspective, such reviews do more harm that good. The objective is to provide constructive criticism and/or genuine praise to better inform the author and prospective readers.
  4. Give the Author at Least 3 Stars– here I am taking my cue from author Daniella Bova, who states at her blog DaniellaBova.com, “Authors put their heart and soul into their writing, so I will never give any book less than 3 stars. I just won’t review it at all.” Words to live by. If you really hate a book for whatever reason (poorly written, plot holes, undeveloped characters, etc.), it’s best to heed our mothers’ advice, “If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all.” Instead, contact the author privately (if they’ve made their email public or have a public Facebook page where you can message them) and share your thoughts. By doing so, you’ll help them improve their writing skills while saving them the embarrassment of a 1-or 2-star public review. Do unto others, as you’d have done to you, after all.

Here’s an example of a thorough book review:

Water Signs was one of those rare books that I had to force myself to put down because it was such an engaging, refreshing read. I enjoyed the fact that the story was set around the Jersey shore, as I am a Jersey girl myself. But what truly kept me reading was that Daria put so much life into her characters! Their personalities, their personal convictions, and their sense of family were so palpable that every time I read a page, it was like coming home to friends. The story kept me hooked all the way through, allowing me to experience Ken and Maddy’s life journeys along with them right on to the very end. If you are searching for a truly good book that will leave you satisfied, Water Signs is definitely worth every penny!

Full Disclosure: I am the author of Water Signs and host of Your Book Your Brand Your Business. The book review above is one of my favorites for the reasons I described in this post. Happy reading…and don’t forget to write a quality book review for the author!

‘Married to the Mossad’ Author Shalva Hessel Joins Daria Anne on Your Book Your Brand Your Business

Can A Wife And Mother Thrive In The Secret World Of Spies? A Woman Who Joined Her Husband On Missions For The Mossad Shares Her Stories

Tune in to Your Book Your Brand Your Business on Monday, March 25 at 5 PM Eastern on W4CY Radio when ‘Married to the Mossad’ author Shalva Hessel joins Daria Anne for a fascinating interview:

The fight against terrorism often happens outside the media radar in a world of secret missions and James Bond-style intrigue. And while these exploits in espionage conjure a macho image, it’s often women who taking a leading role – and face dangers in the bargain.

“Women are especially suited and needed for fighting terrorism and crime,” says Shalva Hessel, author of “Married to the Mossad” (www.shalvahessel.com), a fictionalized version of her own real-life story. Hessel knows something about the subject because she joined her husband on his secret missions for the Mossad, the Israeli national intelligence agency. Why would she subject herself to such dangers? She has a ready answer.

“It’s only when you rise above your own narrow self interest that you find the courage to achieve great things,” Hessel observes. “But women’s contributions to the fight against terrorism don’t always get the attention they deserve. You can’t win the fight against our enemies without strong, brave women at the front,” Hessel states. “Even in the most macho environment like the Mossad, CIA or FBI, the women’s role has never been more important.”

About the Author:

Shalva Hessel.

Shalva Hessel, author of ‘Married to the Mossad’ (www.shalvahessel.com), was raised on Moshav Hibat-Zion in central Israel. She is a software engineer and has managed information systems for companies around the world. When her husband, who served in a senior role in the Mossad, left on secret missions, she joined him as part of his cover. Today she lives in Tel Aviv and is involved in charitable ventures, as well as business management.

During the episode, Hessel will discuss her experiences going undercover with her husband and the role women play in the fight against crime and terrorism. As always, we’ll take your questions from the chat room and look forward to your participation.

Preview and/or purchase Married to the Mossad on Amazon.com.

UPDATE: Missed the live episode? Click here to listen on iHeartRadio.