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war | W4CY Radio

Posts Tagged ‘war’

‘Flying Warrior’ Author Jules Harper on Your Book Your Brand Your Business

United States Navy veteran and author Jules Harper joins me on Monday, January 28 at 5 PM Eastern to discuss his book, Flying Warrior: My Life as a Naval Aviator During the Vietnam War:

A Vietnam veteran takes you into the cockpit and shares true stories of his flying career in this compelling memoir.

In this action-packed memoir, Jules Harper recounts the unique process of becoming a naval aviator, revealing his experiences as a brand new pilot in a combat squadron and, finally, a flying warrior.

He survived two combat cruises aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk from 1966–1968, compiled 332 career carrier takeoffs and landings, and was shot at daily by enemy fire while completing 200 combat missions over Vietnam, and shares the views of the aviators who flew along with him on these missions while fighting this unpopular war. A recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross, twenty-one Air Medals, and many other accolades, he offers readers a new understanding and appreciation of the warriors who protect not only their comrades in arms, but the defense of the nation as well.

About the Author:


Jules Harper is uniquely qualified to write about combat missions over Vietnam as he personally flew 200 combat sorties from 1966-1968. As the public affairs officer for his attack squadron stationed aboard the USS Kitty Hawk, he wrote many articles about his squadron mates’ missions that were published not only in newspapers and magazine but were also used in television shows. As a highly decorated Naval Aviator, after retiring from a major airline with 33,000 flight hours, he has been the President of a Veteran’s club, served on the board of directors for the Naval Air Historical Society in Fort Lauderdale, FL, and given presentations to other clubs. Companies have hired him to give inspirational talks.

You can preview and purchase his book in Kindle and paperback on Amazon.com, where it has received multiple 5-star reviews.

“Jules has captured the stark essence of the air war in Vietnam. I thought I knew what those guys were going through at the time, but I really didn’t. Between December 1965 and May 1966 I served as a flight surgeon assigned to two A-4 squadrons (VA-113 and then a complete cruise with VA-112) aboard the USS Kitty Hawk during combat operations mostly on Yankee Station in the Gulf of Tonkin during the Vietnam War.  Many of the pilots in this special book were my dear friends.  I found several of their names on the Vietnam Memorial in Washington D.C. which I visited last year.  This book is very readable in a most unassuming and matter-of-fact way.  Jules had an amazing career ultimately with two hundred combat missions.  Those trips up north had to be terrifying.  Not one A-4 pilot ever used me to shirk his duty.  I flew as a crewman a good deal in the “Whale”, the A-3 tanker, and rode through several night cat shots and landings.  So, I did have an inkling of an idea about naval carrier operations.  Maybe that’s part of the reason why this book had such an emotional impact on me.  Thank you, Jules, for the book and for your honorable and unassuming contribution in what turned out to be a thankless job.  I remember seeing soldiers and sailors during WW-II as a six-year-old in 1943 at Union Station in Chicago that were traveling by train across the country.  We were there to see my cousin (US Coast Guard).  I remember girls and bands and balloons.  There was nothing like that when we came home from Vietnam.” ~  John F. Murphy, M.D., Retired US Naval Flight Surgeon, 1965-1969.

“Jules, I was very impressed!  I know you said you had some historical reference material but, even so…I’m totally amazed at how much of the ‘detail’ you could recall.  I’m sitting there reading – and can almost ‘hear & feel’ the ‘action taking place around me’. Thank you so much for taking the time and putting forth the effort to do this.”  ~ John Lones, Jules’ squadron mate

During the live interview, Jules will discuss his motivation for writing his book and why he waited until now to publish it, the process by which he wrote the book, reader reactions, his best and worst memory of Vietnam, and so much more. We’ll also take your questions from the chat room. Please tune in on Monday, January 28 at 5 PM Eastern to Your Book Your Brand Your Business with Jules Harper.

In the meantime, discover more about this decorated Vietnam veteran and author at his website: www.juleshharper.com.

Author’s Note: I made a correction to the post after publishing the wrong website. I apologize for the error.

Peace on Earth, Beyond the Season

Ah, the holidays! A wonderful time of the year for many reasons: the birth of Jesus, Christmas decorations, the exchanging of gifts, families coming together to celebrate, and holiday carols that remind us of “peace on Earth, good will towards men”. It’ s a lovely sentiment that for most seems as elusive as the unicorn and as unattainable as achieving perfect health. How can we possibly have world peace when we cannot even get along with our spouses, parents, and siblings? Putting up with some of them for a brief amount of time during Dec. stretches our patience to the limit.

We’ve had great leaders like Nelson Mandela, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Mohandas Ghandi, and of course, the Son of God, who devoted their lives to fostering peace within the hearts of humanity. Yet as I sit here in front of my computer, we still have troops in Afghanistan losing their lives in battle and violence in every corner of this world. In Matthew 5:9, the Lord tells us, “Blessed are the peacemakers.” But who are these people? Why do some propose peaceful coexistence while others choose aggression and violence?

There are certain qualities associated with peacemakers such as compassion, kindness, confidence, and a sense of fairness. They respect all life as sacred and honor each form. Helpful, forgiving, and loving, they are all inclusive and embrace all of humanity as equals.

But we cannot expect the world to live harmoniously unless we first create peace within ourselves. And we do that by the following:

1. Remove all expectations from others and allow each person to be who they need to be.
2. Forgive all those who have mistreated us, even those who do not apologize.
3. Choose kindness as a way of life.
4. Appreciate and validate all whom you encounter no matter how different.
5. Extend peace and love to all whom you meet every day, in every moment.

Once you have found peace within yourself, bring that into your family:

1. Encourage love, joy, and acceptance of all.
2. Be the peacemaker in disputes. Make an effort to help heal the rifts.
3. Make allowances for the imperfections of all members.
4. Be all inclusive; embrace every one.
5. See the value and goodness in each person and help them develop that.
6. Give them the benefit of the doubt when a misunderstanding or incident occurs.

Then extend your peacemaking efforts to your workplace and community. Nurture it and it will grow. Let peace become who you are. Let peace become your way of life.
In the words of John Lennon: “Image all the people living life in peace. You may say I’m a dreamer… I hope someday you’ll join us and the world will live as one.” Peace, my friend.

To order a copy of The Secret Side of Anger or The Great Truth visit http://www.pfeifferpowerseminars.com/pps1-products.html

Violence, 911, and War: There’s a Better Way

Since the beginning of time, wars have been fought in an effort to bring about peace. Have we accomplished that yet? Maybe violence isn’t the answer.

I am a peace lover. Not only do I promote peaceful coexistence but I also live peacefully with others. I do not argue or fight; I do not promote or instigate dissension between family or friends; I am careful never to offend anyone and apologize quickly if I do. I have yet to meet anyone who loves brutality or war yet I continually encounter those who live violent lives.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr said, “It is not enough to say, ‘We must not wage war.’ It is necessary to love peace and sacrifice for it. We must concentrate not merely on the negative expulsion of war but on the positive affirmation of peace.” But how is that possible in a world filled with terrorists determined to annihilate all those who oppose their radical ways? Lawfully, we have a right to defend ourselves against those who pose a threat to us. We may use reasonable force in the face of peril. Therefore, if someone endangers my life, I may have a legal right to take theirs.
But my religious beliefs tell me hurting and killing others is wrong. The Sixth Commandment clearly states “Thou shalt not kill.” To the best of my knowledge, there is no amendment which states, “with the following exceptions.” All human life is sacred and I firmly believe in the preservation of such. But do I have a moral right to extinguish the light of another in order to protect mine? Herein lies my quandary.

In my latest book, The Great Truth, I speak of a great Spiritual Truth which redefines the meaning of our existence. Life is not about my experiences nor my relationships nor being happy. I firmly believe that in each human encounter God expects us to respond in accordance with Divine Law. Do I make decisions that are in my best interest or do I obey my Heavenly Father? As in war, a soldier may be given a command by his/her superior but feels their way is a better one. Yet, the soldier is obligated to obey the commanding officer not only for the soldier’s best interest but for the safety and benefit of the entire unit and ultimately their country as well. One arrogant act of disobedience can prove catastrophic.
So it is with God’s Command. We may not always be privy to the bigger picture. Yet if we are true disciples of the Lord God, then we must obey each of His Laws without question, trusting that His Way is the right way. We do not hand-pick those teachings which momentarily suit our needs.

In a recent statement regarding the latest terrorist attacks in Seria, Pope Francis calls for a peaceful response: “Violence and war are never the way to peace… War always marks the failure of peace; it is always a defeat for humanity.” Godly words, for sure.

The human side of me struggles with the dilemma of how I would respond should someone attack one of my children or grandchildren. Would I use deadly force to protect them or would I relinquish my human rights to Divine Decree?
Matthew 16:24 ~ Then Jesus said to His disciples, “If anyone wishes to come after Me, he must deny himself, and take up his cross and follow Me.”

Maybe there is a higher purpose to not waging war or fighting back. After all, this world and all its events are but a moment in time. It’s the next life that is eternal. I pray that I am a true disciple of the Lord and will faithfully follow His teachings. “Peace is the way, not a goal.” ~ Janet Pfeiffer

Order your copy of The Secret Side of Anger or The Great Truth @ http://www.pfeifferpowerseminars.com/pps1-products.html